Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal
Goodson Watson, PhD   and   Edward Glaser, PhD
Columbia University Teachers College   1925

The Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is an assessment tool designed to measure an individual's critical thinking skills. It has a long history of use in educational and business settings, since the 1930's. It is used by organizations, such as law firms and the CIA, to determine an individual's ability to think critically and as a way of assessing their suitability for an organization or a specific position within it.  It includes the following sub-tests.

1. Inference
2. Recognition of Assumptions
3. Deduction
4. Interpretation
5. Evaluation of Arguments

Quick Test - 5 minutes  PDF

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Excellent
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1) INFERENCE: An inference is a conclusion that a person can draw from certain observed or supposed facts. For example, if the lights are on in a house and music can be heard coming from the house, a person might infer that someone is at home. But this inference may or may not be correct. It is possible that the people of the house did not turn the lights and the radio off when they left the house. In this test, each exercise begins with a statement of fact that you are to regard as true. After each statement of fact you will find several possible inferences i.e., conclusions that some persons might draw from the stated facts. Examine each inference separately, and make a decision as to its degree of truth or falsity. 
Studies have shown that there is relatively much more heart disease among people living in the north of England than people living in the south of England. There is little if any difference, however, in rate of heart disease between northerners and southerners who have the same level of income. The average income of southerners in England is considerably higher than the average income of northerners. 
True
Probably True
Insufficient Data
Probably False
False
True
Probably True
Insufficient Data
Probably False
False
True
Probably True
Insufficient Data
Probably False
False
True
Probably True
Insufficient Data
Probably False
False
2) RECOGNITION OF ASSUMPTIONS: An assumption is something presupposed or taken for granted. When you say, 'I'll be a qualified solicitor in two months', you take it for granted that you will be alive in two months, that you will pass the relevant examinations, and similar things. Below are a number of statements. Each statement is followed by several proposed assumptions. You are to decide for each assumption whether a person, in making the given statement, is really making that assumption i.e., taking it for granted, justifiably or not. 
Statement: "The proper aim of education in a free society is to prepare the individual to make wise decisions." 
Made Assumption
Not Made
Made Assumption
Not Made
Made Assumption
Not Made
Made Assumption
Not Made
3) DEDUCTION: In this test, each exercise consists of several statements (premises) followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, consider the statements in each exercise as true without exception. Read the first conclusion beneath the statements. If you think it necessarily follows from the statements given, mark 'Conclusion Follows' in the proper place on the Answer Sheet. If you think it is not a necessary conclusion from the statements given mark 'Does Not Follow', even though you may believe it to be true from your general knowledge. Similarly, read and judge each of the other conclusions. Try not to let your prejudices influence your judgment just stick to the given statements (premises) and judge whether each conclusion necessarily follows. 
No responsible leader can avoid making difficult decisions. Some responsible leaders dislike making difficult decisions. Therefore: 
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
4) INTERPRETATION: Each of the following exercises consists of a short paragraph followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purpose of this test, assume that everything in the short paragraph is true. The problem is to judge whether or not each of the proposed conclusions logically follows beyond a reasonable doubt from the information given in the paragraph. If you think that the proposed conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt (even though it may not follow absolutely and necessarily), mark ''Conclusion Follows' in the proper place on the answer sheet. If you think that the conclusion does not follow beyond a reasonable doubt from the facts given, mark 'Does Not Follow'. Remember to judge each conclusion independently. 
In 1970, 60.4% of adults (people 25 years of age and older) had completed 11 years or less of schooling, while 4.6% had completed three or more years of university. In 1990, 40.0% of adults had completed 11 years or less of schooling, while 7.1% had completed three or more years of university. 
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
Conclusion Follows
Does Not Follow
5) EVALUATION OF ARGUMENTS: In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between arguments that are strong and arguments that are weak, as far as the question at issue is concerned. For an argument to be strong, it must be both important and directly related to the question. An argument is weak if it is not directly related to the question (even though it may be of great general importance), or if it is of minor importance, or if it is related only to trivial aspects of the question. 
Should the government provide 'baby grants' to help support each dependent child in a family so that the family standard of living is not lowered by having children? 
Strong Argument
Weak Argument
Strong Argument
Weak Argument
Strong Argument
Weak Argument

STOP. You may go back and check your work. 


Thank You


Critical Thinking Ability  UKQA 

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